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Previous Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award Winners

Previous Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award Winners

2012 Award Winner
Deanne van Rooyen

Deanne

Deanne van Rooyen was awarded the 2012 Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award for her research project “Origin and geological history of Proterozoic, Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks in the southern Thor-Odin area, B.C, based on mapping, structural, geochemical, geochronological and thermochronological constraints: Implications for accretionary tectonics and orogenesis in the southern Canadian Cordillera.” Deanne is a PhD student in the Department of Earth Sciences at Carleton University.






2010 Award Winner
Toronto, February 4, 2010 - Joel Cubley wins the 2010 Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award

Cubley 2010This year’s winner of the Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award is Joel Cubley, a doctoral student in metamorphic petrology at the University of Calgary. Joel wins a $3,000 cash prize for his Ph.D. thesis, Structure and metamorphism of the Grand Forks Complex, British Columbia. 
 
A second cash prize of $1,000 is being awarded this year for the first time. University of British Columbia student Rose Cobbett wins this for her M.Sc. thesis, The timing and kinematic evolution of the Duke River fault, southwest Yukon: Insights into the formation of the western Cordilleran orogen.
 
The award commemorates geologist Mary-Claire Ward who, before her death in 2004, worked hard to convince policy and decision makers of the value of geological mapping and its economic contribution to this country.
 
The award was established by a group of organizations, including the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada and the Geological Association of Canada, to encourage and support a graduate student in Canada whose thesis would contribute to knowledge about the geological history of Canada. Mapping is an important component of the winning thesis.
Joel will be presented with his award at a student luncheon during the PDAC’s annual convention, to be held in Toronto from Sunday, March 7 to Wednesday, March 10.

2009 Award Winner
Elizabeth Westberg wins the 2009 Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award

Westberg 2009Congratulations to Elizabeth Westberg, winner of this year’s Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award.
 
Elizabeth is a graduate student at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia. Her award-winning thesis topic is entitled Constraining the conditions and timing of deformation and metamorphism of the Yukon-Tanana terrane in parts of the Mendocina Creek (NTS105F5) and Livingstone Creek (NTS 105E8) areas of south-central Yukon.
 
Elizabeth was presented with her award, comprising $3,000 and a framed certificate, at a student-industry luncheon on Tuesday, March 3 during the 2009 annual convention of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada.
 
This award commemorates Mary-Claire Ward who died in 2004. She devoted much of her volunteer work to informing governments about the importance of this nation’s geoscience knowledge base and the need for adequate funding to maintain it. The intent of the award, which was established in 2005, is to encourage and support a graduate student in Canada whose thesis will contribute to knowledge about the country’s geological history. 
 
The award is administered by the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, the Geological Association of Canada, the National Geological Surveys Committee, and Watts, Griffis and McOuat Ltd. The financial administration is provided by the Canadian Geological Foundation.
 
Application details are posted at pdac.ca and gac.ca by October 1 every year and the deadline for applications is mid-December. Awards winners are announced in February.

2008 Award Winner
Jean-François Ravenelle wins the 2008 Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award

Rave 2008Congratulations to Jean-François Ravenelle whose research project, Geology of the world-class Roberto gold deposit, Eleonore property, James Bay, Quebec, has won him this year’s Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award. Jean-François is a doctoral student in structural and economic geology at the National Institute of Scientific Research, Laval University.

Jean-François will be presented with his award at a student-industry luncheon on March 4 during the 2008 annual convention of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada.

The intent of the award is to encourage and support a graduate student in Canada whose thesis will contribute to knowledge about the geological history of Canada. Mapping will be a significant component of the winning thesis.

The award is administered by the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, the Geological Association of Canada, the National Geological Surveys Committee, and Watts, Griffis and McOuat Ltd. The financial administration is provided by the Canadian Geological Foundation.

2007 Award Winner
UNB student Andrew Parmenter wins the 2007 Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award

Winner of this year’s Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award is Andrew C. Parmenter, a doctoral student at the University of New Brunswick.
Parmenter 2007
Andrew’s research project, The structure of the Cranberry Mountain region of the Thor-Odin dome, Monashee Complex, and its bearing on the tectonic evolution of the Canadian Cordillera in southeast British Columbia, won him the $3,000 cash award and certificate, both of which will be presented at the student-industry networking luncheon on Tuesday, March 6, during the annual convention of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC).

This annual award honours the memory of Mary-Claire Ward, a geoscientist who held that geological mapping and an up-to-date geoscience knowledge base are fundamental to this country’s economy and worked hard to convey this message to Canada’s policy makers.

The award is administered by the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, the Geological Association of Canada, the National Geological Surveys Committee, and Watts, Griffis and McOuat Ltd. The financial administration is provided by the Canadian Geological Foundation.

Application details are posted at pdac.ca and gac.ca by October 1 every year and the deadline for applications is mid-December. Awards winners are announced in mid-February.

2006 Award Winner 
Tony Barresi Wins 2006 Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award

Barresi 2006The Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award Selection Committee is pleased to announce that the winner of this year’s award is Tony Barresi. Mr. Barresi is a doctoral student at Dalhousie University and is specializing in earth sciences. The thesis that won him the award is entitled Tectonic and petrogenetic evolution of Early to Middle Jurassic Hazelton Group volcanic rocks, northwestern British Columbia: Physical and geochemical anatomy of an arc to rift transition. Mr. Barresi will be presented with a $3,000 cash award and certificate at the PDAC’s annual awards evening on Monday, March 6, in Toronto. He will also be recognized by the Geological Association of Canada at its annual meeting in Montreal in May.

The primary objective of the award is to encourage and support a graduate student in Canada whose thesis is likely to increase our knowledge of the geological history of Canada through mapping. The award is organized through a coalition of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, the Geological Association of Canada, the National Geological Surveys Committee, and Watts, Griffis and McOuat Ltd. Each organization is represented on the selection committee. The financial administration is provided by the Canadian Geological Foundation.

The award was created in 2004 to honour the memory of Mary-Claire Ward, a geoscientist who was a strong advocate for maintaining Canada’s geoscience knowledge base as one of this country’s principal economic advantages. She translated her firm beliefs into political action, persuading policy makers at every opportunity that mapping is key to understanding and benefiting from this country’s rich natural endowment.

In announcing this year’s award, selection committee chair Bill Mercer commented on the high quality of this year’s applicants and the work that they are doing. “This is the second year that we have given this award,” he said, “and once again the committee was impressed with the excellent standard of the applications. Selecting a winner is always difficult, and those applicants who didn’t win should not be deterred from applying again in future. We want to offer as much encouragement as possible to students working in this important field.”

February 8, 2006

2006 Award Winner
Michelle DeWolfe wins the first Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award

DeWolfe 2005

The Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award Selection Committee is pleased to announce that the winner of the first award is Michelle DeWolfe. Ms. DeWolfe is a doctoral student at Laurentian University, specializing in geology. Her award-winning thesis is entitled Volcanic Reconstruction of the Paleoproterozoic Hidden and Louis Formations, Manitoba, Canada. Ms. DeWolfe will be presented with a $3,000 cash award and certificate at the PDAC’s annual awards banquet on Monday, March 7.

The Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award honours the memory of Mrs. Ward who died in 2004. Mrs. Ward was a passionate champion of the geosciences and a fervent advocate for preserving Canada’s geoscience knowledge base. The intent of the award is to encourage and support a graduate student in Canada whose thesis is likely to increase our knowledge of the geological history of Canada through mapping.

The award was created by the many colleagues of Mary-Claire and organized through a coalition of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, the Geological Association of Canada, the National Geological Surveys Committee, and Watts, Griffis and McOuat Ltd. Each of these organizations is represented on the selection committee. The financial administration is provided by the Canadian Geological Foundation.

In announcing Ms. DeWolfe’s win, Bill Mercer, chairman of the selection committee, commented on the high calibre of applications for the award. “The exceptionally high standard of the submissions made the selection process extremely difficult for the committee. We were very impressed with the quality of the students’ theses and their understanding of the importance of mapping. Mary-Claire would have been very pleased.”

February 16, 2005